I suffer from garden envy, says Charles: Prince admits feeling crestfallen at the sight of other people’s roses after decades of trying to perfect his landscape at Highgrove .

This post has been seen 328 times.

He has gardens in palaces and stately residences, but Prince Charles admits even he sometimes suffers from garden envy.

The Prince of Wales has spent decades toiling to create the perfect English garden on his estate at Highgrove in Gloucestershire using organic techniques.

Yet he says he often feels crestfallen at the sight of other people’s roses.

Prince Charles and Princess Diana pose with Princes William and Harry in the wild flower garden at Highgrove

Prince Charles and Princess Diana pose with Princes William and Harry in the wild flower garden at Highgrove

The Prince takes great pride in his garden at the Gloucestershire estate. Pictured, the tulip walk

The Prince takes great pride in his garden at the Gloucestershire estate. Pictured, the tulip walk

In an interview with BBC Radio 4’s Gardeners’ Question Time to be broadcast this afternoon, the Prince said he was still learning how to garden.

‘I’ve learnt a lot in going to look at other people’s gardens,’ he said. ‘This is the key, I think, before you go too far. You need to go and look.

 

‘Every time I go to someone else’s garden I think, “Bother! It’s so much better than mine. How do they get their roses to do this?”’

The Prince talked about his great love of organic gardening and said he approached it with child-like enthusiasm.

The Prince, pictured sitting on a bench at Highgrove, said he was still learning how to garden

The Prince, pictured sitting on a bench at Highgrove, said he was still learning how to garden

Charles, pictured in the garden, also said he was hoping to kindle the love of the English garden in his grandson

Charles, pictured in the garden, also said he was hoping to kindle the love of the English garden in his grandson

He added that he tried to instil fun by building a tree house in a holly bush at Highgrove – dubbed Holyrood Tree House – for his sons William and Harry when they were young.

Charles also said he was hoping to kindle the love of the English garden in his grandson – he and Prince George had planted two trees together at Highgrove.

But, while he lauded the organic approach to gardening, the Prince dismissed questions about his reported practice of talking to plants. He scoffed and said: ‘You can’t make a joke, can you?’

Comments

comments

You might also like More from author

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons