12 Practical Ways to Eat Healthy (While Keeping Your Grocery Bill Low)

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Do you want to spend less on your grocery shopping while still eating healthily? Many people think that healthy eating is expensive, but there are tips and tricks you can use to make sure you eat healthy food without spending too much.

Just check out these 12 practical ways to eat healthy, while keeping your bill manageable.

1. Buy organic food locally

Organic food is a great way to make sure you are eating healthy food, but it is often expensive in supermarkets. However, it is normally much cheaper at your local farmer’s market. Additionally, you’ll find different, fresher-than-fresh options as the seasons change.

2. Invest in a slow cooker

A slow cooker is a great way for you to make healthy meals cheap and easy — they are perfect for making nutritious stews, sauces and soups. You can simply put the ingredient in the crock pot in the morning and you will have a hot, delicious meal ready for 5 p.m.

3. Cut down on meat

Meat is a great source of protein, but it can be quite expensive. Save some money by eating one meatless meal a day, or try eating a vegetarian diet for a few days each week. Cheap and healthy protein alternatives include tofu, beans and whole grains.

4. Add an extra day between grocery shopping

Instead of doing your grocery shop once a week, try and make your shop last eight days instead. This will help you to use up forgotten-about canned and frozen food, making your money go a little further.

5. Use the freezer

Most people are often inclined to throw away food that has nearly reached it’s sell-by-date, but freezing it will save you money and make sure the food doesn’t get wasted. You can also buy reduced milk, meat and bread that are near their sell-by-dates. Just freeze them for later use.

6. Budget your spending

If you don’t already have a budget, set one for your grocery shopping every week — and stick to it. Once you are in a routine, take a close look at your grocery bills and see if there is anything especially expensive that you could stop buying.

This will help you to figure out what is wasting your money and what isn’t.

7. Cut out restaurants and take-out

Eating out is expensive, and often many people don’t actually realize how often they are doing it. Drive-thru’s, take-out coffee, delivery food, cafés and restaurants are all pricey alternatives to preparing your own food and drink.

Carrying a thermos of coffee and making your own lunch are all good ways to avoid take-out temptation.

8. Buy less branded food

You don’t have to cut out your favorite branded products, but many cheaper alternatives have the same taste and nutritional value. Read the packaging to find alternatives that will taste similar, with a lower price.

9. Price match different stores

Many people do their full grocery shop at one store, but this means they are probably missing out on savings. As mentioned in point one, farmers markets will often have cheaper organic food. And butchers are well known for better quality, cheaper meat.

Shop around and find the cheapest places so you know you are always getting value for money.

10. Buy food in bulk

Many stores offer deals where you can get more for your money by buying in bulk. Grains, nuts, spices and sweets can often be bought in bulk, and they have a long shelf life — so there is no pressure to use everything up quickly.

11. Plan your meals at the beginning of the week

Don’t shop without deciding what you want first, as you are more likely to impulse buy expensive products you don’t need. Write a shopping list before you go, and aim to find the cheapest option in the store.

12. Buy frozen food

There is a common misconception that all frozen food is unhealthy — it simply isn’t true. Frozen vegetables and fruit still retain their nutritional value, and they are often much cheaper than the fresh alternative.

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